UFO Lottery update

The UFO Lottery is doing quite well, I have finished UL 4 und UL 5. Unfortunately, the words for the entries took a wrong turn somewhere and are now meandering around in the maze of my brain. They will turn up eventually.

For UL 6, I’ve drawn Scrappy. Although I’ve already chosen the backing and binding fabric I’m not quite sure if or how to finish this small piece. The sashing is way too wide, maybe I’ll be taking the top apart again and try something different. What do you think?

‘Scrappy’ top

Meanwhile, I’ve already started working on UL 7, not wanting to waste my precious time. Yes, I’m on a roll. 🙂

Bargello (UL3)

Friday’s second finish is

Bargello

A machine pieced un-quilt from a pattern inBurda Patchwork (Fall 2015). I made a smaller version with only 14 colours instead of 31. Size is 66 x 68 cms and I used a thin polyester batting like I usually do with batik fabrics.  What I had in mind when chosing the fabrics was a mother-of-pearl colourway you’ll find in a paua shell, but it might as well resemble oil on water or a coral reef.

The binding and backing fabric is one of my most cherished batiks and it cost me some willpower to use it. 🙂

backing fabric

I’ve already drawn the next winner, another piece that needs only little time to finish.

Marmor (UL 2)

Two finishes yesterday! This is the first one –

Marmor (Marble)


This piece was started on June 12, 2007 – it only took ten years (and four days) to finish 😉 It still surprises me it was so many years ago I started this one.

The idea behind this piece came from my Isfahan and Breakdance un-quilts. The wrong sides had such a beautiful texture and I thought it would make a great project of its own. Again, the pattern comes from ‘Tilings and patterns’ (Grünbaum/Shephard). I can still remember where I bought the batik fabrics, it was the Dutch-German fabric market in Hamburg. Not with this special project in mind, but a matching set of four resembling actual marble colours.

Finished size is 48 x 63 cms, number of pieces is 288. Size of squares is 15 mms (9/16″)

texture created with pieces used from the ‘wrong’ side, hand stitching is clearly visible

 

Bargello

For my third machine sewing project I used a bargello pattern from Burda Patchwork (Fall 2015), but made a smaller version with only 14 colours instead of 31.

I chose the fabrics with a mother of pearl colourway in mind, but it might also resemble you of oil on water.

Sewing these three pieces, I got a little more skilled in machine sewing. I have chosen a couple of other projects to make, but first I need to finish my UFOs and then practice some machine quilting.

Tomorrow it’ll be back to work after two weeks off.

To bin or not to bin

– that’s the question

Let’s face the truth, I’ve messed it. I’m talking of the Skipping Stones quilt top.

After hours of careful piecing and redoing a few of the seams I had the finished rows on my design wall. Some of them went together quite well, others are significantly longer. No way to make them fit.

Dave the Muse, consulted for a solution, said ‘Bin it, unpick and resew it or make it into an art quilt.’

Binning is out of the question, of course. And I haven’t got any spare time for ripping and resewing as the next project is already calling my name. So art quilt it is.

Pulling every other row slightly to one side, I sewed the rows together, chopping off quite a couple of the matching points I was so proud of, but heck. That’s what the artist intended.

Next, please!

A couple of weeks ago I was leafing through some old patchwork magazines. The universe may be infinite but my storage space isn’t and I thought of discarding them. But I found a lot of ideas and patterns I hadn’t cared about then so I kept the magazines.

I still had the remaining batiks on my cutting mat and also the leftovers from another project and decided to give one of the projects a try. The one I started came from the Spring 2015 edition of Burda Patchwork, a pattern called Hüpfende Steine (Skipping Stones).

I cut 10 cm squares (36 dark, 102 light)

pinned two squares together

sewed around all four edges

cut diagonally twice

pressed them open and clipped the ‘ears’

and pinned them to my design wall.

This is one of the main design elements. I’m working with a mirror image of the pattern because I prefer it that way and want to hang it in portrait format instead of the original landscape format.

In the middle of sewing the squares together I ran out of thread. So far, I always used white cotton Gütermann Obergarn. I replaced this with white cotton sewing thread from my local drugstore which was all I could get at that time. And guess what? My moody little Pfaff is purring like a cat now. 🙂

Negotiations with my sewing machine

Another mean green machine

Me: You’re a sewing machine, you’re supposed to sew.
She, slightly offended: I’m not a sewing machine, I’m a Pfaff.

My sewing machine, a Pfaff Performance 2058, is really a she – as moody as a female teenager. And as for the performance bit, she’s quite good at performing her moods. I’ve heard this from other Pfaff owners before.

I had been looking for a pattern to use a couple of batiks in autumn colours. A while back I found a block called Circle of Friends. Kate had made the block in her F²F challenge in September and I fell in love with that one. But it took a little while before the batiks and the block came together.

My hand piecing skills aren’t what they used to be so the new project called for a little machine piecing. Thus the negotiations with my machine.

Cutting the fabric for nine blocks took half a morning, then sewing was on the agenda. It went relatively well, maybe because I dropped the words scrap metal occasionally. Anyway, I had to take the first block apart completely and had to resew it because of a little too much wonkiness for my taste.

A couple of mismatched seams later, I’ve got a new quilt top. I already have an idea how to quilt it.

Crossed Colour Bars Finished

The thread I used for sewing around the border kept tangling so I put this piece aside for a couple of days after two of the seams were done. I gave it another try yesterday and finished it today during my lunch break. I solved the thread tangling by pulling the thread only a little through the needle at the end.

This is the third and last panel made of 3 cm squares (576 of them) in the English paper piecing technique, the finished size is again 75.5 cms square.

For the borders I made half inch strips with my bias maker from a batik similar in colour than I used for the ‘cross’. The backing fabric is folded to the inside and I used my favorite hemming technique for finishing. The sewing was done with variegated amber buttonhole thread.

backing fabric

‘Cross I’ Finished

Another finish. 🙂 This was the first project I made cutting up quarter yard pieces of six fabrics and sewing them back together in the same way as they came from my cutting mat. In this case I used two quarters each of three different fabrics. They came from some surprise medleys I ordered several times from an American company so I had some doubles.

The panel is made of 3 cm squares (576 of them) in the English paper piecing technique, the finished size is 75.5 cms square.

Again, for the borders I made half inch strips with my bias maker from the same dark red batik I used for the ‘cross’. The backing fabric is folded to the inside and I used my favorite hemming technique for finishing. The sewing was done with red buttonhole thread.

backing fabric

‘Cross II’ Finished

Another one off the list. Cross I is also finished, I’ll blog about that one later. That leaves me with only twelve more to finish from the UFO Lottery (and a half, as Crossed Colour Bars is already on my ironing board). I’m only one year behind schedule. Not bad. 🙂

I’ve called this Cross II because I wanted to let the colours cross each other. After lots of rearranging I came up with this chessboard strips layout instead. The panel is made of 3 cm squares (576 of them) in the English paper piecing technique, the finished size is 75 cms square.

For the borders I made half inch strips with my bias maker. The backing fabric is folded to the inside and I used my favorite hemming technique for finishing. The sewing was done with turquoise buttonhole thread (I forgot to take a close-up).

The fabric I’ve chosen for the back of this project is a bold yellow/red/green batik. As it wasn’t big enough I cut up a fat quarter of the same design in red. It seems a little off-kilter in the picture but I assure you all seams and angles are perfectly straight as they are supposed to be. 🙂 At least my new camera is delivering the colours a little more natural than the pocketcam under the poor lighting conditions in my hallway (my design wall has currently been taken over by something else).